Beijing accuses Australia of harassing Chinese journalists

Beijing accuses Australia of harassing Chinese journalists


The Chinese authorities accused Australia on Wednesday of"blatant ridiculous behaviour", harassment and breach of their rights of its own journalists by hunting and separating items from the houses of four Chinese state press coworkers.  The connection between the two big trading partners have become increasingly entangled, and Beijing's revelation that Australia had conducted the raids in late June arrived as a well-known Chinese academic affirmed his Australian visa was cancelled on safety grounds.   Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Australian officials reported that a potential breach of the nation's foreign interference legislation because of their raids in June, but hadn't supplied a"rational explanation".  "The Australian government's behaviour... intentionally violates the valid rights and interests of Chinese journalists and caused severe harm to the physical and psychological health of their journalists and their families," Zhao said at a daily briefing.  "We request Australia to immediately prevent such blatant ridiculous behaviours, cease harassing and oppressing Chinese employees in Australia under whatever pretext,"  Zhao said officials captured notebooks, cellphones, and a kid's toy tablet in the houses of colleagues from sockets such as state news agency Xinhua and the China News Service. 

Beijing accuses Australia of harassing Chinese journalists


A spokesman for Australia's Attorney General Christian Porter had previously declined to comment on"operational issues", in reaction to a Xinhua report regarding the raids, but added that police"take problems of foreign interference quite severely."  The Australian overseas office didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.   The Chinese embassy in Canberra said that it had supplied consular aid to journalists targeted at the raids.  Australia's already tense relationship with China worsened this year following Beijing vowed commerce reprisals and stated it had been angered by Australia's call for a global investigation into the origin of the coronavirus pandemic.  Both Australian journalists who came home from China on Tuesday had sought refuge at the embassy in Beijing and the consulate in Shanghai after police entered their houses a week back and told them that they had been barred from leaving China.   Chinese officials confirmed Tuesday she had been held on suspicion of illegal actions that undermine China's safety.   Documents Found in Australia's High Court on Aug. 3 reveal a team member of Moselmane, John Zhang, has been investigated by the Australian Federal Police for allegedly acting on behalf of the Chinese country in"a personal social networking chat team" together with Moselmane.  Moselmane has stated he isn't a defendant in the analysis, telling Australian Broadcasting Corp television a month he engaged in"a social group", such as"a few supporters, foreign journalists and one John Zhang".  Another member of this talk group, Chinese academic, Chen Hong, stated his Australian visa was cancelled on safety grounds based on information from ASIO.  Chen, a professor of Australian Research at East China Normal University in Shanghai, said in a statement he'd travelled regularly to Australia and thought that the blackout was a"gross error".  Chen said he'd been friends with Zhang because 2016 and they fulfilled when he had been in Sydney or Zhang was in Shanghai.  Zhang hasn't yet been charged with any offence and his attorneys are attempting to get the research warrants quashed, according to the court records.

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